Learning Arabic through the culture

Learning Arabic through the culture

Sufis, Lovers and the eyes

This book brings together the words and illustrations published several years ago in the educationaljournal "Textarab" (1) in serial form. Today, we have the pleasure of presenting them complete and accompanied by brief instructions useful for the reader looking to go further.

This workbook contains:
- stories presented in comic strips
- chapter-by-chapter introductions in Arabic and in French
- an Arabic / French vocabulary list for each comic strip These poems are excerpts from the Arab-Islamic patrimony and are arranged in a simplified form to allow beginning readers the chance to access this treasure and to become familiar with several references to the culture whose language they are studying.

Sufism : The origin of the word is unknown. There are several hypotheses on the subject but none are universally accepted. Use of the word began in the second century of hegira (ninth century AD).Its meaning has evolved over time...

(1) 27 rue de Chartres 75018 PARIS Publications: Textarab, Annales Baccalauréat Arabe

"Sufis, Lovers, and the Eyes"- Z.Gain

"Sufis, Lovers, and the Eyes"- Z.Gain

Through the culture : " The sufis"

At first, it signified asceticism and devotion, before acquiring the meaning of knowledge “of the interior” (isoteric).Scholars understand religion as consisting of two parts: the “exterior” (esoteric) and the “interior” (isoteric). The esoteric comprises the respect of the commandments of Shari’ a, including cultural rites, while the isoteric is a free and sincere spiritual experience that an adept seeks out. Sufis assemble under the guidance of a sheikh who has received isoteric knowledge from his predecessors.

They form a tariqa (fraternity) that has its own ritual which, in principle, does not contradict the Shari ‘a, even though some have become famous for errors that sheikhs and those with esoteric knowledge have condemned...A Sufi can reach a type of holiness (walaya) and receive the karamat (supernatural powers) that make him well known. The Sufi fraternities have played an important role in the Islamization of Asia and Africa, because they taught the Mohammedan message while practicing the method that we have discussed, which created desire rather than inspired fear by addressing each human being at the level of her conscience. These experiences and powers inspired numerous poems whose goal is to educate the listener or the reader with an indirect teaching that develops his comprehension of supernatural realities.

We were inspired to bring you this collection of stories and illustrations with the hope that we could make the Sufi literary patrimony available even to beginning readers of Arabic. The goal is to take you beyond cultural bias to learn Arabic.

Sufis, Lovers, and the Eyes

Learning Arabic through the culture

Through the culture : Love and eyes

Love : The Arab civilization, like others, has taken an immense interest in love. There are numerous poems and stories that testify to this interest. In this part, we present several of the best-known love stories, which we have taken from the “kitâbu-l-aghânî” (Book of Songs) of al-Asfahânî...

The Eyes : On the expressive power of the eyes, a power characteristic of Oriental peoples. Oriental women do not need to be nude to captivate the men, and the men know better than any others how to read the mysterious messages of the eyes.

How marvellous are the eyes! Look and draw a teaching from them! Under the veil, they speak during the day. There are eyes that say, “I know you, by the prophet, I have not forgotten you, from the day I saw you by the window, lovely child!” And there are eyes that smile, but fool you, for if you look beneath the veil, you will find a beak. There are eyes that say, “I am amorous, let’s go to the house!” And eyes that say, “ Too bad for you if you do not come, I am going to the zâr(1)” And eyes that one cannot know whether they are angry or content, day and night are lost in their thoughts.

(1)zâr : exorcism ceremony Poem in Egyptian dialect by Bayram at-Tunsi

Sufis, Lovers, and the Eyes